Harold Pinter

Harold Pinter

 

In 2005, Harold Pinter was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature, “who in his plays uncovers the precipice under everyday prattle and forces entry into oppression’s closed rooms”. the highest honour available to any writer in the world, He born 10 October 1930 in East London, playwright, director, actor, poet and political activist. He died 24 December 2008. He got recognation for his powerful and thought provoking plays. He was a masterly playwright of fine talent and vigour who wrote at the top of his powers and shown an exceptional awareness of his craft. His career, as a dramatist, was an experimentalist career. He was the product of a post-war generation that has attempted to reject the evils of the twentieth century and present a new outlook on society. He broke the rigid rules of construction and dialogue, which English playwrights were expected to observe He wrote twenty-nine plays including The Birthday Party, The Caretaker, The Homecoming, and Betrayal, twenty-one screenplays including The Servant, The Go-Between and The French Lieutenant’s Woman, and directed twenty-seven theatre productions, including James Joyce’s Exiles, David Mamet’s Oleanna, seven plays by Simon Gray and many of his own plays including his latest, Celebration, paired with his first, The Room at The Almeida Theatre, London in the spring of 2000.He was awarded the Shakespeare Prize (Hamburg), the European Prize for Literature (Vienna), the Pirandello Prize (Palermo), the David Cohen British Literature Prize, the Laurence Olivier Award, the Legion d’Honneur and the Moliere D’Honneur for lifetime achievement. In 1999 he was made a Companion of Literature by the Royal Society of Literature. He received honorary degrees from eighteen universities.

Pinter had been a champion of freedom of expression for many years through his association with International PEN. In 1985, he joined the American playwright Arthur Miller on an International PEN-Helsinki Watch Committee mission to Turkey to investigate and protest the torture of imprisoned writers. There he met many victims of political oppression. At an American embassy function honouring Miller, instead of exchanging pleasantries, Pinter spoke of people having an electric current applied to their genitals – which got him thrown out. (Miller, in support, left the embassy with him). Pinter’s experience of oppression in Turkey and the suppression of the Kurdish language inspired his 1988 play Mountain Language

Pinter’s interest in politics was a very public one. Over the years he spoke out forcefully about the abuse of state power around the world, including, recently, NATO’s bombing of Serbia. His most recent speech was given on the anniversary of NATO’S bombing of Serbia at the Committee for Peace in the Balkans Conference, at The Conway Hall June 10th 2000.

 

Designed by HP Infotek